Science Spotlight

Get to know our research team! A bi-weekly look into the scientists in and around the Tissue Engineering Resource Center.

Pamela Graney, Ph.D.
Pamela Graney, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Scientist

Twitter: @PamGraney

What is your background & how did you get into science/tissue engineering? 

My amazing AP Chem teach in high school saw potential in me, and urged me to consider chemical engineering. Thanks to her guidance, I earned my BS in Chemical Engineering in 2009 from Rowan University. At that time, I had never heard of tissue engineering. I was immediately fascinated with the idea of repairing and regenerating the body's tissues when I met Dr. Jennifer Vernengo, who as my Masters advisor introduced me to the world of Biomedical Engineering. I went on to earn my PhD in BME from Drexel University, under the mentorship of Dr. Kara Spiller, who not only helped me discover my love of macrophages (the coolest immune cells), but also profoundly shaped me as a researcher and scientist.

What are you working on now?

My current work leverages our lab's organ-on-a-chip system to probe the role(s) of tissue resident macrophages and bone marrow-derived myeloid cells in priming the pre-metastatic niche and facilitating metastasis of breast cancer cells.

Favorite scientific innovation of the 21st century? 

Tough question! Microphysiological systems and cell agriculture are pretty high on my list of favs!

Fun fact about yourself? 

I run on plants and coffee, and occasional snuggles from my 3-legged pup, Ellie.

What are you most excited about for the future?

So many things! From innovation in sustainable practices to engineering a patient-on-a-chip. I'm hopeful for the future and determined to contribute to the change...

Sarah Kaslow, M.D.
Sarah Kaslow, M.D.

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Twitter: @sarahkaslow

What is your background & how did you get into science/tissue engineering? 

I earned my medical degree at the University of Maryland in 2018 and a Masters in Public Health from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in 2017. I joined the lab in July 2020 after completing two years of General Surgery residency to study whole lung tissue engineering utilizing the cross-circulation platform developed in the Laboratory for Stem Cells & Tissue Engineering and induction of immunotolerance in kidney transplantation.

What are you working on now?

As part of the lung team, I am currently working on developing a large animal model of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, decellularization and recellularization of lung tissue in situ, and the use of mesenchymal stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles as a therapy for severe lung injury.

Favorite scientific innovation of the 21st century? 

The use of vaccines to transform public health -- HPV vaccines to prevent cancer, mRNA vaccines to mitigate pandemics, etc.

Fun fact about yourself? 

I love anything ROYBIV.

What are you most excited about for the future?

I am most excited about continuing to share the world with my 4 year old son--to show him how wonderful humans are at changing our world and how impactful we each can be.